A Farewell For Now

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Dearies, Kat just gave me the most exciting news! We’re going on a trip around the world! Apparently she’s been planning this trip for quite some time, but kept it as a surprise. We’re going to see some amazing tea-growing regions! Isn’t it thrilling? We are going to tour though India, Sri Lanka, China, Taiwan, and Japan! We may even get to Africa! Oh I’m so excited that I can hardly sit still in my saucer. I’m going to learn so much more about tea! How it’s grown, processed, and sold! It’s the trip of a lifetime.

If you’re wondering how a fragile tea cup will travel, don’t worry! Kat will wrap me up very well, and she even has a special velvet-lined box for me. I feel positively royal! Lately I’ve been longing for my travel days with dear old Char, and I’m so delighted that I’ll get to have all new adventures with her granddaughter Kat. I think this time around things will look quite different! It’s been a very long time since I’ve left the house, let alone travelled to a far-away place.

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Of course, this means the blog may be quiet for a while. I won’t have access to our computer since we’ll be out and about. I am sad that the blog will go dark for a while. I’ll certainly miss all of you dear readers very much! I cherish our twitter conversations! But thank you so much for being loyal followers and reading all I have to say about tea. It’s been a pleasure to share with you. I do hope we can connect again soon. This is farewell for now, but I hope to see you all when we get back! Take care Dearies, and happy sipping.

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Behind The Leaf: Scented Teas

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We’ve been enjoying a particular type of tea these days. A tea that melts the snow and warms our hearts. These special teas are scented teas. Have you tried Jasmine tea before? If so, you’ve had a scented tea. These are teas that have flowers added to the pure leaves, and are allowed to absorb the heavenly floral aroma. These steeped teas impart a gorgeous floral aroma to the air while they brew. Scented teas are only flowers and tea- not any other added flavors. It can take a few weeks to scent tea naturally with layers of flowers. It is a delicate process that takes patience. They are a bit harder to find but worth the hunt.

 Scented teas are not all created equal. It’s not easy to find just the right balance of flowers to tea. You don’t want to overpower the tea, just enhance it. Finding that balance takes a tea master. Scented green teas are most common but you can also find scented black and oolong teas. A few of our favorites are:

Jasmine: it’s easy to find Jasmine tea, but finding a tea scented just with jasmine blossoms is a bit more challenging. Make sure you’re not getting a tea scented with added aromas or oils. Jasmine tea was invented in China during the Song dynasty. Quite a long time ago.

 Rose- if you love roses as much as we do, why not try it as a tea? The soft, soothing rose flavor is immensely pleasing. Perfect for a quiet afternoon with a few French macarons on the side. Quite a sophisticated cup!

 Chrysanthemum- this delicately sweet tea is subtle and delicious. The flavor is reminiscent of honey and also has a mild herbaceous note. This tea is supposed to have quite a few medicinal benefits as well, but we like to drink it just for the taste and for how relaxed we feel afterwards. This is a tea you can typically find at Chinese restaurants, along with Jasmine tea.

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I love floral teas all year round and especially love them in the wintertime. That gentle floral flavor brings the hope of spring, even on the coldest, most blustery day.

 Other scented teas will contain flowers such as chamomile, and hibiscus. These can also be found as herbal blends, and not necessarily scented teas. But the possibilities are endless, and finding new and interesting scented teas is such fun!

 You should brew your scented teas just like you would the pure tea it comes with (ex: the temperature for green tea, if your base is green). We love using small glass teapots for scented teas, as you can see the beautiful flower petals dancing along with the leaves. It makes for a much more enjoyable experience. Watching those vibrant petals just brings the warm spring sunshine indoors.

Ask Tippy: How Can I Start a Teacup Collection

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Ask Tippy is a series where you get to take control of the blog, and ask me questions about tea! Do you have a question about tea types? Tea preparation? Teaware? Ask away! I received the following question from twitter friend Carolina:

Q. Tippy, I just love the look of mismatched vintage teacups but I have no idea how to start collecting them. Do you have any advice?

A. Well my dear, you have come to the right place! Being a teacup, I have tea ware friends far and wide that I’ve met in all sorts of places. I think the first thing you should decide is if you’d like to go modern, vintage, or both. If you’re looking for vintage pieces try auctions, garage sales thrift stores, and antique shops. Look for estate sale listings too. Flea markets are also a fun way to shop for teacups. There are usually quite a few vendors with inexpensive tea ware. Online auctions are also a great way to browse, just make sure you look carefully at pictures and read all the descriptions. Used tea ware can often have chips or cracks and if you are unsure based on the pictures given, be sure to ask to see more photos.

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You’ll have to decide what ‘look’ is right for you. Are you interested in fancy china cups, sleek art deco styles, or something else? Do you like minimalist style or something more ornate? There is also an entire range of art pottery out there that you can find on Etsy or even Instagram. Or perhaps you like all of it! We certainly do. Kat’s collection of teacups is always growing. I feel like such a proud mother to our colorful brood!

Another tip is to look for teacups while you travel. Many cultures drink tea and have unique tea ware. For example, you can get tulip shaped glass cups in Turkey, and yixing clay cups in China. Kat likes to pick up pretty bone china cups in London, especially in the antique markets there. Or even just around the US you can find various potters working locally that make beautiful tea ware. Kat was in a little beach town and came across a local potter who makes beautiful tiny teacups. Keep your eyes open while you walk about town! Bigger cities will of course have even more to choose from.

Once you start collecting, you can display your cups anywhere you like. Kat likes to keep hers in a china cabinet, to make sure her little niece Camille doesn’t accidentally break one of her favorites. But she also pulls out her mismatched china cups and saucers for tea parties. She has every day useable art pottery for special tea sessions alone or with friends. And of course she has me! Her trusty friend and tea addict. But I’m one of a kind, of course!

Dearies, do you have a burning tea question you’d like answered? Tag me on twitter @TheLovelyTeaCup!

Ask Tippy: What is Genmaicha?

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Dearies, it’s time for our next installment of ‘Ask Tippy’! This is where you the readers get to ask me anything you like about tea! Our latest question comes from a reader named Betty.

Q. Tippy, what is genmaicha? I was in a Japanese restaurant over the weekend, and it was on the menu. Is it a green tea?

A. Very good question, Betty! Genmaicha is in fact a Japanese tea blend that includes green tea. The tea is usually bancha or sencha, with roasted and popped brown rice added in. This is a common tea to find in Japanese restaurants, as it’s a mellow, every day drinking tea.

The quality of the genmaicha depends on the green tea used. As I mentioned it is commonly found with bancha or Sencha. Sencha is the most popular Japanese green tea and varies in quality based on the season it is picked. The tea is steamed rather than pan fired, and produces a lovely green hue and deeply vegetal flavor when steeped. Bancha is quite similar but produced from both leaves and stems of the tea plant so the quality is a little lower than Sencha. But both are lovely when blended with the roasted rice. To create the rice for the tea, the rice is soaked, steamed, and then dried and roasted. The rice used can be white or brown, but usually white rice is used. It looks brown from the roasting process.

In Japanese, genmai means roasted rice. Cha means tea. When you first open a bag of genmaicha you may be surprised by the nutty aroma. The roasted rice gives the blend a deliciously earthy, nutty scent that pairs very nicely with the vegetal green tea. The other thing that you may notice is something a bit unique for tea- popcorn? It’s actually popped rice! On occasion the rice will pop while it’s roasted, which makes it look like popcorn!

In some cases it can also have some matcha mixed in. This blend will usually be a bit more expensive than typical genmaicha. If you’re not sure if there is matcha in your genmaicha, you’ll be able to easily tell once you open the bag. The roasted rice will have a greenish hue from the matcha, just like in my above picture.

If this tea sounds interesting to you, definitely seek it out! It’s widely available and is often offered in Japanese restaurants. Enjoy!

Ask Tippy!

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Dearies, I’m so excited to share my latest addition to the blog. It’s called ‘Ask Tippy’. This is where you get to take control of the blog, and ask me questions about tea! Do you have a question about tea types? Tea preparation? Teaware? Ask away! I received this question recently from a reader named Andrea, and I thought I should make the answer into a post. Here we go!

Q. Tippy, do I need to use an electric kettle to get the perfect water temperature? Help!

Andrea, thank you so much for your question! Well, it is certainly very convenient to have a hot water kettle, especially one that heats the water to the exact temperature you need for your tea. But if you don’t have one, there is no reason to fret. There are various thermometers on the market that you can use to measure your water temperature if you’d like. You’d boil up your water, pour into a vessel and then measure and wait until you’ve hit the desired temp. Or, often times Kat will just boil her water and take the kettle off the heat and wait about 2 minutes if she’s making green or white tea. If you aren’t doing a professional tasting, you don’t need the temperature to be absolutely exact. Sometimes I find that I prefer a temperature slightly different to what is suggested for the tea. But here are some temperature guidelines for you (these temperatures are all listed in Fahrenheit and vary a little bit basted on the type of tea in the category):

White: 180°

Green: 170°-185°

Oolong: 180°-210°

Black: 200°-210°

Puerh: 200°-210°

Herbals: 200°-210°

Another thing to keep in mind is your water quality. If you live in a place with tasty water, you can go ahead and use that unfiltered. But if you have water that is hard and filled with minerals, it’s best to filter it if you can. Kat keeps a filter pitcher on her counter at all times so she can always have water ready for tea. Of course, if you can use spring water it is ideal. But filtered water is just fine. It’s also fun to play around with different types of water to see how it changes the taste of your tea.

So Andrea, definitely purchase a kettle for convenience and exact temperatures, but don’t feel like you absolutely must have one.

Dearies, if you have a question for me, please feel free to ask just like Andrea! The easiest way to do so is to tag me on twitter @TheLovelyTeaCup